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PBS
Nov 8, 2012 12:00am PST
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama returned to washington today after winning the electoral college, the popular vote and a second term. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the "newshour" tonight, kwame holman wraps up the results and the reaction and ray suarez reports from chicago on the president's day. >> woodruff: we assess the tactics that led to success for the obama campaign and failure for mitt romney. >> ifill: we examine the messages voters sent yesterday with jeffrey brown, who looks at the makeup of congress and the new laws around the country. >> woodruff: what to do about the fiscal cliff, healthcare and immigration? we explore the challenges ahead in the next four years. >> ifill: and back with us again, for analysis, are mark shields and david brooks. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and with the ongoing support of these instit
PBS
Nov 2, 2012 12:00am PDT
christie took a tour yesterday of the inland areas before his encounter with president obama and he went to a town called sayerville where he went door to door meeting with the people who came out to talk to him, shake hands. he was bolstering their spirits but in some cases there were people who broke down in his arms and cried and he became more than the chief executive of this ste, he became the consoleer in chief, if you will. and that is a story that repeated itself a number of times later in the ty. the governor and president obama took a helicopter ride over the area from atlantic city down to an areahere the governor had told people to get ohe and in many cases they didn't and he kind of jokingly but firmly let them know when they were speaking a couple minut after the video you're seeing right now, he let them know he was not happy with them but he'd give them a break thisnuime around. but it's just a veryi, very kind of like -- this is a -- you know it's not a big state geographically but it's a very densely populate state and very diverse when it comes tola geography as toll.
PBS
Nov 7, 2012 6:30pm PST
. this is not the election outcome that wall street wanted to see. after all many investors believe president obama's tax policies will hurt corporate profits. on top of that there's the likelihood of more regulation in the president's second term. those concerns were evident in selling today of energy, banking and healthcare stocks. a quick look at the price board at the new york stock exchange is a good barometer for the worrywarts out there. wall street veteran teddy weissberg says many investors are just plain upset. >> there was an expectation that we would have some change and a change in the policies. and, i think with obama getting re-elected there are a lot of folks that are not happy, and we're kind of seeing that in the stock market. >> reporter: but, others say it's not just the disappointment of romney's loss, it's that the fiscal cliff now looms large on wall street. >> i think the big issue right now is the fiscal cliff, now that the election is behind us everyone is really focusing on what's going to happen at the end of this year, and of course if nothing's done by the end of the year th
PBS
Nov 9, 2012 11:00pm PST
obama is back in the white house, democrats are back in control of the senate, and republicans are back running the house. that's what prevailed before americans voted, when deadlock reigned in washington, little got done, and the country was frustrated and angry. are we in for more of the same? the talk we are hearing in washington sounds altogether too familiar. so let's consider what's ahead with two people of different philosophies about what should be done. bob herbert was a long-time liberal columnist for "the new york times" until he retired last year and became a distinguished senior fellow for the national think tank demos. he's been on the road for months now, reporting for his forthcoming book, "wounded colossus." reihan salam writes "the agenda," that's a daily blog for the conservative national review online. he is a policy advisor at the think tank economics 21 and a columnist for reuters. he is also the co-author with ross douthat of the much talked-about book, "grand new party: how republicans can win the working class and save the american dream." welcome to both of you
PBS
Nov 7, 2012 12:00am PST
president of the united states. incumbent barack obama or challenger mitt romney. >> woodruff: it is just after 7:00 eastern time. polls are beginning to close in the east and the south. t,t fact, s states closed just a moment ago at theag the hour. using exit polling data and surveys of early voters, the associated press is beginning to project a winner in a number of states. we're going to be watching for that as soon as we get it. i'm told, gwen, we do haveoneon call. the networks, two television networks are projecting the state of kentucky will go for mitt romney which is not a surprise. a state that john mccain won four years ago. >> ifill: not a big surprise. all of these results will-jump-starting the all-important electoral college count. 270 is the magic numberne candidate has to reach to become the next president. right now the associated press is predicting nothing because we don't know yet what is going to happen with those electoral votes. but we're waiting. >> woodruff: i just now am being told, gwen, and this information is comingnn as we're sitting here. the sta of india
PBS
Nov 6, 2012 12:00am PST
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: president obama and mitt romney sprinted through swing states making their final arguments on this day before election day. good evening. i'm gwen ifill.ll >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we start with two reports from the candidates' command centers. ray suarez is in illinois, and margaret warner is in massachusetts. >> suarez: at obama campaign headquarters in chicago, they're confident of a narrow win. >> romney's srgategists are counting on the undecided independent voters breaking his way. >> ifill: then, thousands of people in new york and new jesey are still without power, cold and in the dark even as schools and businesses reopen. kwame holman has our update, one week after the storm. >> woodruff: and special correspondent rick karr tells the story of a hard-hit brooklye neighborhood struggling to get back on its feet. >> ifill: back on the campaign trail, we head to ohio, the ultimate battleground state, where volunteers on both sides took to the streets this weekend. >> now tha
PBS
Nov 3, 2012 12:00am PDT
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions woodruff: president obama hailed another month of job growth, while mitt romney cited an up-tick in the unemployment rate as proof of an ecomic standstill. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, with the final data before election day now out, we look at the overall jobs picture in america, and how the candidates are and are not addressing it.om >> woodruff: then, long gas lines, continuing power outages, and massive cleanup effort in the northeast.fo ray suarez updates the slow imb back after the storm. >> brown: ordinary citizens, some of them school children, caught in the crossfire in syria's war. margaret warner has our reort. >> as syrian rebels expand the areas they control, ther assad regime has turned to long-range artillery and air attacks to hit the opposition and civilians as well. >> woodruff:ege have ae "battleground" distch from iowa, where immigration is d rarely menoned by thy candidates, but is on the minds of voters. >> although latinos make up only 5% of iowa'
PBS
Nov 17, 2012 12:00am PST
download. >> take a look at this, the obama campaign spent $47 million on digital sending. and the romney campaign spent 4 my 7 million. a 10 to 1 gap. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes, it's obvious, and sometimes, it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can provide customized experiences tailored to individual consumer preferences, igniting a world of possibilities from the inside out. sponsoring tomorrow starts today. >> bnsf railway support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like
PBS
Nov 3, 2012 1:00pm PDT
that president obama is moving forward.t i them jerry brown seeps this as canoe theory that he's practiced before. i will tell you, i think those vie taupes and a lot of other decisions were all done with an caeye toward a coalition for th election. we felt it in sacramento that the governor was making decisions that were trying to set him up with what he thought was the best constituency at the polls. i think the voters have a choice to make about whatey issue they care most about what they have to mark that ballot on tuesday and i will say if we've looked at the wa voter registration has increased, we've seen a lo of voters, we think are young vot voters, and those young voters, they really are a mor diverse group ethnically. more diverse financially than a lot of the other voters in california. maybe that includes the latino community, as well. it's a great questi.es >> belv well, have any of you heard anything about the attitude of people about the amount of money coming into the state, anybody at the table? >> i know in the presidential ration, this has been a really interesting thing to wa
PBS
Nov 16, 2012 11:00pm PST
endorsed barack obama for re-election, just take another look at the widespread havoc caused by the frankenstorm benignly named sandy. having surveyed all this damage "bloomberg business week" concluded: "it's global warming, stupid: if hurricane sandy doesn't persuade americans to get serious about climate change, nothing will." well it was enough to prompt president obama, at his press conference this week, to say more about global warming than he did all year. >> i am a firm believer that climate change is real, that it is impacted by human behavior and carbon emissions. and as a consequence, i think we've got an obligation to future generations to do something about it. >> but he made it clear that actually doing something about it will take a back seat to the economy for now. he did return to new york on thursday to review the recovery effort on staten island. climate change and hurricane sandy brought naomi klein to town, too. you may know her as the author of "the shock doctrine: the rise of disaster capitalism." readers of two influential magazines to put naomi klein
PBS
Nov 29, 2012 12:00am PST
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama said today he believes a framework for a debt-cutting deal can be reached in the coming weeks. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we get the latest on the efforts to resolve the impasse over tax hikes and spending cuts. >> brown: then, we get two views of a palestinian bid for limited statehood, ahead of a key vote tomorrow at the united nations. >> warner: wonder why your bills are going up? paul solman examines "the fine print" with author and journalist david cay johnston. >> i'm not against corporations. i am in favor of rules that make you earn your profits in the competitive market. you don't get them through a government rule that lets the company reach in your wallet and take money. the kinds of profits that we're >> brown: after the election, what's next for immigration reform? ray suarez asks texas senator kay bailey hutchison and illinois representative luis gutierrez. >> warner: and on the "daily download," we look at how the obama adm
PBS
Nov 27, 2012 12:00am PST
research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked online today, as digital deals were to be had, and holiday shoppers lit up web sites. retailers had high hopes that cyber monday sales would add to what's been a strong start so far. >> if all goes as expected, today will end up being the busiest online david year, with major bargains and steep discountses just a click away. >> every year we see more and more consumers shopping is online, both the younger com
PBS
Nov 13, 2012 6:30pm PST
on friday between president obama and congressional leaders. they will be talking about ways to solve the so-called "fiscal cliff" dilemma. investors appear cautious about making any big moves until they know whether the cliff will trigger increases in capital gains and dividend taxes. the dow fell almost 59 points, the nasdaq lost 20, and the s&p was down five. meanwhile, in washington, congress returned to work for the first time since september. lawmakers face a long "to-do list," and getting a deal on that fiscal cliff is right at the top. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: it was freshman welcome day in washington. senate republican leader mitch mcconnell lost ground in the election, but he posed for the cameras with the three new senators who will be joining his side of the aisle in january. in the house, minority leader nancy pelosi beamed as she presented the new faces adding to democratic ranks in the coming congress. given what awaits these new lawmakers in january, you might wonder why they want the job. it's still not clear whether a lame duck session of congress will navigate th
PBS
Nov 9, 2012 12:00am PST
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> brown: president obama was back at the white house today and congress returns to washington early next week. top on the agenda for both: a looming fiscal crisis. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we assess the task ahead in negotiations to avoid an economic hit from automatic spending cuts and tax increases. >> brown: then, we examine what's next for the republican party, after a second straight presidential campaign rebuke from a changing american electorate. >> woodruff: the associated press still hasn't called a winner in florida. why not? and why were the lines so long at some polling places across the country? ray suarez gets some answers. >> brown: john merrow tells the story of pediatricians with a new prescription: books to build better brains. >> there's solid research that shows that just that intervention of handing a family a book, giving them a couple of age-appropriate pieces of advice about how to read with their kid and just encouraging reading, they--
PBS
Nov 20, 2012 12:00am PST
resistance going. >> brown: president obama makes an historic trip to myanmar. ray suarez looks at the asian country's steps away from a closed military dictatorship. >> woodruff: paul solman reports from the rockaways on new york's long island about insurance woes for victims of hurricane sandy. >> everything you're looking at here is destroyed. this used to be a really beautiful restaurant. >> where is the financing coming from if you don't have flood insurance? >> i don't know. i really don't. >> brown: and we close with the first of several conversations we'll have with newly elected senators. tonight: maine independent angus king. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> intel. sponsors of tomorrow. >> the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation fo
PBS
Nov 10, 2012 12:00am PST
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama addressed the looming fiscal crisis for the first time since the election, and insisted once again he won't accept a deal unless it includes higher taxes on the wealthy. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, we'll have excerpts from the president's remarks, and our own debate on the economic challenges ahead with two senators, maryland democrat ben cardin and tennessee republican bob corker. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez has the latest on the surprise resignation of cia chief david petraeus after admitting to an extra-marital affair. >> brown: it's still cold and dark in many new jersey homes. special correspondent rick karr follows utility crews as they work to turn the electricity back on. >> access to these lines is quite difficult, cutting through peoples' backyards. you may come in one and cross four other yards just to get to your job site. >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on toni
PBS
Nov 5, 2012 6:30pm PST
news. >> reporter: on the other hand, corpina doesn't think the re- election of president obama will trigger a selloff.so more likely he would expect to see status quo for stocks. >> i think people have bought intohe fact that the market is going to take a long time to recover, our economy is going to take a long time to recover and the market has seemed to stay on the track so to speak.in >> reporter: of course there is also the possibility however remote, that it might take days bore we know who will occupy the oval office. that's a scary flash back to the hanging chad debacle of the 2000 election. >> think the odds are against it. i shudder to think. but, you remember how bad it wa back in 2000. it was crazy, it drove people crazy, it drove the market crazy. i don't think that happens. i think one of these guys wins handily. >> reporter: and, then there are those who believe the stock market will rally no matter who wins tomorrow. that's because at least some uncertainty will finally be removed from the market. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: joining us now for m
PBS
Nov 20, 2012 6:30pm PST
obama, we had taken a defensive stance already. we had gone slightly underweight equities, and added more things like high-yield mortgage debt, emerging market debt, and mortgage-backed securities, that will yield as much as capital appreciation, and investments that have lower volatility than the stock market. so we have an overweight there. those investments i just spoke about, that's about 24% of our portfolio right now, and that's definitely helped us get through the last few weeks without giving up much of our gains. >> susie: tell us a little bit about -- well, you are on the buying side with equities, what are you buying? are you in u.s. stocks? international stocks? what is the mix? >> sure. one of the interesting things i think over the last few months, and maybe this isn't putting it very elegantly, but i like to think about it as revenge of the global investor. for all of 2011, and the start of 2012, we saw the s&p as one of the world's leading stock markets. and a lot of investors said, why don't i just own u.s. stocks and why bother with this global investing stuff. but
PBS
Nov 15, 2012 12:00am PST
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: president obama held firm on higher taxes for the wealthy today and said there's no evidence national security was breached in the petraeus affair. both comments came in his first official news conference since the election. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight: we have extended excerpts of the president's wide-ranging exchange with reporters, from immigration to benghazi to reaching out to mitt romney. >> woodruff: we zero in on two topics, starting with the spiraling scandal that forced the c.i.a. director to step down. >> ifill: and we assess the administration's post-election agenda with senators dick durbin and kay bailey hutchison. >> woodruff: then, ray suarez gets the latest on the escalating violence in gaza after israeli air strikes killed the military leader of hamas. >> ifill: plus, there were new calls today for laws to police pharmacies like the one linked to the meningitis outbreak. betty ann bowser's update includes the story of one family's loss from the
PBS
Nov 2, 2012 6:30pm PDT
because basically the unemployment rate is where it was when obama was sworn in. now the obama administration is pointing out they created more than five million jobs since the president took office inre the ivate sector, that is. and also, if you look at the first full month the president was in office the unemployment rate was 8.3%. now it's 7.9. >> tom: instead of arguing about the data, what about the demographics here? because polls, obviously, show this is an%. extremely close rae going into tuesday. so what about the key voting demographics in this jobs report? >> reporter: you know, one little nugget that i thought was very interesting, the unemployment rate for white men has fall tone 6.6% and about a year ago it was 7.8%. otingis a key demographic, but interestingly enough, even though the unemployment rate is coming down, that demographic is going as much as two toot one for romney. youo know, sometimes demographic information and the unemployment information doesn't always sync up. >> tom: timing is everything in terms of synchingy up for whoever wins next week and
PBS
Nov 14, 2012 12:00am PST
house today, press secretary jay carney said president obama still has faith in general allen and is not contemplating shake-ups in his national security team. >> he's focused on the missions that the military has passed with care... is tasked with carrying out and the c.i.a. and the general intelligence community, the tasks they're carrying out. and with enacting his overall agenda. >> brown: meanwhile the petraeus probe continued. f.b.i. agented searchd the home of paula broadwell in charlotte, north carolina late last night. at the u.s. capitol today, returning lawmakers were still looking for answers. one was republican senator susan collins of maine. >> i am puzzled by much of what has occurred in the f.b.i. investigation and also the latest information that perhaps general petraeus' friends had access to some classified information. we don't know whether that is true or not. >> brown: others including house minority leader nancy pelosi focused on why the f.b.i. did not officially inform congress about the petraeus matter much earlier. >> i think there's some answers that
PBS
Nov 16, 2012 6:30pm PST
: that and more tonight on n.b.r.! >> susie: so far so good on the fiscal cliff. president obama and congressional leaders got off to a good start in their first round of negotiations. the president met with congressional leaders who emerged later to say they want to move quickly to prevent automatic spending cuts and tax increases from tanking the economy at the first of the year. but as darren gersh reports, what we are not yet clear about is whether either side is willing to give up enough to get the job done. >> reporter: in washington, they think carefully about the pictures they want to present to the public so this mattered. all four congressional leaders-- democrats and republicans-- after meeting with the president chose to face the cameras together. that hardly ever happens and it reflects the new post-election mood of cooperation. house speaker john boehner called the meeting very constructive. >> i outlined a framework that deals with reforming our tax code and reforming our spending. and i believe the framework that i've outlined in our meeting today is consistent with the president's
PBS
Nov 24, 2012 12:00am PST
in the middle east? >> yeah, well, first i thought president obama deserves a great deal of praise for how he's handled this. he could have really taken it out on-- some people thought he has not been supportive of israel. some people thought since benjamin netanyahu was a little pro-romney it seemed during the campaign there might be some bad blood there. but i think it has to be said over the last couple of weeks, the obama administration has been extremely supportive of israel. that's one thing. and the second thing they've done is work with the new egyptian government and that was not necessarily a done deal, either. so they've given us this cease-fire. and so we had a pretty, you know, serious military exchange. but the american-egyptian relationship was not frayed. the american-israeli relationship was not frayed. and importantly, the israeli-egyptian relationship, while frayed, is still functioning. so i think they've done a reasonably good job of stabilizing things. now, morsi has taken this opportunity to create a bit of a constitutional crisis there, and there we're going to have to
PBS
Nov 28, 2012 12:00am PST
obama sat down with mexico's president-elect, enrique pena nieto, this afternoon. one topic for them and for us tonight: the war on drugs, on both sides of the border. >> suarez: as lawmakers talk of reducing the country's debt, paul solman offers a history lesson on centuries of federal borrowing. >> the united states was going into default. we defaulted on many obligations to foreign creditors and to our own soldiers. >> brown: plus, every month, 1,000 young americans are infected with h.i.v., and most of those with the disease don't even know they have it. hari sreenivasan looks at a new report from the c.d.c. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contrib
PBS
Nov 30, 2012 12:00am PST
's hands has without us doing anything and that's a major problem in a security issue for the obama administration. >> warner: you were telling me before we came on that you'd seen another video that also suggests that. tell us about that. >> that's right. there was a video released a few days ago in which -- in the video it was an organization fly a black flag, clearly something jihadist saying to europeans and americans "we don't need you, we have these weapons, we'll do it on our own." so our worst nightmare through neglect seems to be coming true in syria. >> warner: quickly, how close is the u.s. to changing its policy at all from what you've been able to discern? >> i think it is on terms of recognizing the government in exile which we -- was formed in doha. in terms of arming the opposition, i'm not sure. it might be something that's been debated to death. there's no action out of the obama administration. we were hoping it was going to happen earlier, it didn't happen and it seems now that the people -- the jihadists and salafists have the arms now including shoulder-fired a
PBS
Nov 15, 2012 6:30pm PST
focus." >> susie: tomorrow is a big deadline for president obama's health care insurance reform. it's the day states across the country must decide if they will be setting up their own health insurance exchanges, or if they will opt out and let the government do it for them. sylvia hall takes a look at the exchanges, how they'll work, and how they will impact the way americans pay for care. >> reporter: the idea behind state health insurance exchanges is pretty simple-- the uninsured will have a central place to shop for health insurance. all plans will meet minimum coverage requirements and no one is turned down. in exchange, health insurance companies get more healthy customers, costing them less, because virtually everyone is required to buy health insurance. for those who can't afford it, the federal government provides subsidies. >> it's a little bit of a grand bargain that's been struck with the insurance industry-- you stop doing some of that cherry- picking behavior that's been so problematic, and in return, we'll guarantee you that there will be a steady stream of customers
PBS
Nov 14, 2012 6:30pm PST
>> this is n.b.r. >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. president obama says he's open to new ideas, on raising government revenues, but eliminating tax deductions for the rich doesn't go far enough. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. stocks slide to four-month lows, on worries that a fiscal cliff deal is a still a long way off. >> tom: and with a national health care insurance overhaul underway, a company's share of health insurance has risen at its smallest pace in a decade. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> tom: with 47 days left for president obama and congress to agree on avoiding a combination of higher taxes and government spending cuts, the president today said he won't extend tax cuts for people who don't need them. that hard line came during a white house press conference just as a negotiations with republican leaders get underway to avoid the fiscal cliff. as darren gersh reports from washington, even before republicans and democrats sit down to talk on friday, both sides are laying down markers. >> reporter: just two days before he meets with congressional leaders
PBS
Nov 17, 2012 1:00pm PST
this technique? >> both campaigns used this pretty aggressively. the obama campaign probably more so, because they had a head start. they knew who their candidate was going to be and they've been working on this for years. >> is it all legal? i mean, how do they -- >> it's interesting they mention that, it's so much of the information we generate today. we're opting to share that on facebook and all the social networks. we leave this huge digital trail online. in a way we might not do in the offline world. >> basically you're only targeting or finding out about people on facebook and twitter and in the social media. and the old folks, or on the other side of the digital divide, we don't know much about them. >> no, i think those folks are still targeted the old-fashioned way. publishers clearinghouse sold you down the river a long time ago. so they've built profiles on us. now they're just actually targeting us even more. >> it seems like everybody talks a lot about social media and how does that influence voter behavior, but this really seems like this is where the money's at for campaigns.
PBS
Nov 28, 2012 6:30pm PST
today to persuade president obama and congress to avoid the fiscal cliff. with just 33 days left to nail down a deal, c.e.o.s made the rounds to explain to lawmakers that because of cliff gridlock, they're holding back on hiring and spending. as darren gersh reports, c.e.o.s weren't the only ones campaigning hard today. >> reporter: the president and republicans focused today on staging events designed to pressure the other side. the president called on americans to tweet, facebook and call members of congress to tell them to pass tax cuts for everyone making less that $250,000 a year. >> 97% of small businesses would not see their income tax go up by a single dime. even the wealthiest americans would still get a tax cut on the first $250,000 of their income. >> reporter: the speaker dismissed a call from a fellow republican to give the president what he wants, saying it's not good economics to raise tax rates on small businesses. >> going over the fiscal cliff will hurt our economy and hurt job creation in our country. this is not good for our country. it's as simple as that, and the pr
PBS
Nov 21, 2012 12:00am PST
, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: this was a day of urgent diplomacy aimed at stopping the battle of air strikes and rockets between israel and hamas. rumors of a cease-fire flew all day, and secretary of state clinton arrived i
PBS
Nov 8, 2012 6:30pm PST
the mortgage in the housing bust, and the banking collapse. with president obama being re-elected and status quo in terms of the balance of power on capitol hill, what can we expect in terms of banking regulations going forward? >> clearly more regulations. banks are going to have to be stronger. they're going to have to come up with these plans, what happens if they get into trouble. but much more regulation across-the-board. >> tom: what does it mean for shareholders? >> shareholders are being to have some issues with financial stocks. clearly because these additional kline's costs are going to mean greater costs overall to the banks and not as much profit. so the stronger banks will get in the different areas but so many of the weaker banks will have to be merged out. >> tom: another big voice for banking regulations will now be in the united states senate, this is elizabeth warren. she was elected as a democrat from massachusetts for the u.s. senate on election day. she has got quite the resume as chair of the tarp oversight committee and a special advertiser, was a special advertiser to
PBS
Nov 9, 2012 6:30pm PST
tonight compared to a week ago. >> reporter: while president obama and house speaker boehner both say they're open to new ideas, wall streeters remain cautious about the fiscal cliff. meridien equity partners' joe greco says the market doesn't expect it to be resolved this year. >> i think we're going to see a push pull back and forth and we're probably not going to see much compromise until mid to late january. if we don't get things in order by february that's when things can start to get ugly for the markets. >> reporter: with so much short- term risks, greco says retail investors are sitting on the sidelines until congress and the president reach consensus on the fiscal cliff. he says today's buyers were mostly institutional investors. >> you're going to see the bulk of volume just sit it out. because that has been what's worked in the past. if you have a position already it's probably a longer range view in which case no reason to mess around with it in the intermediary push pull. >> reporter: greco says the cliff isn't the market's only challenge. there's still europe's debt crisis a
PBS
Nov 26, 2012 6:30pm PST
, the u.s. economy would suffer big time. the obama administration's economists estimate consumers would spend about $200 billion less next year than they would have otherwise. congress and the administration have only a few more weeks to nail down a deal. but that deal will have to address some tough issues, including entitlement reform. darren gersh explains. >> reporter: the big money in entitlements is in health care, and that means any grand bargain to avoid the fiscal cliff will slice away at one of the nation's most popular programs. >> medicare is clearly in the gunsights. >> reporter: it's possible congress and the president could agree to save $300 to $400 billion from medicare by cutting fees for doctors and hospitals. but analysts worry slashing payments won't make the health care system more efficient. >> this is not really a way to structurally change medicare and if you don't change the underlying incentives, you don't get long-term savings. >> reporter: progressives at the center for american progress say the government could save close to $150 billion by squeezing the pr
PBS
Nov 13, 2012 12:00am PST
. on thursday, the general went to the white house to meet with president obama and his formal resignation followed on friday. since then, key members of congress have complained that they should have been notified much earlier that something was up. senate intelligence committee chair democrat dianne feinstein appeared on fox news yesterday. >> we received no advance notice. it was like a lightning bolt. the way i found out, i came back to washington thursday night. friday morning, the staff director told me there were a number of calls from press about this. this is something that could have had an effect on national security. i think we should have been told. >> brown: on cnn the chairman of the house homeland security committee, republican congressman peter king, also raised concerns. >> this just doesn't add up that you have this type of investigation. the f.b.i. investigating emails. the emails leading to the c.i.a. director and taking four months to find out that the c.i.a. director was involved. i have real questions about this. i think a time line has to be looked at and analyzed
PBS
Nov 22, 2012 12:00am PST
to a kind of inflation in campaign spending and campaign fund-raising. president obama raised a record $1 billion largely because he was warning his supporters urgently that we are going to be outspent by these outside groups. >> woodruff: eliza newlin carney, how did you see the difference between money spending this year and four years ago? >> yeah, there's no question that the outside spending was the big takeaway from this election. as you said, it was more than three times what had been spent four years ago, and most of that was spent by the super pacs, created by the of citizenses united decision and a lower court ruling called "speech now," and the politically active tax exempt groups which also represented the other most important trend hereby the growth in undisclosed money. these groups call themselves social welfare groups even though they're very political in their messages, and social welfare groups don't have to say who their donors are or where their money comes from. so that's a really big change. >> woodruff: matea gold, how did they operate differently from what we've se
PBS
Nov 19, 2012 6:30pm PST
that white house meeting between president obama, and congressional leaders. stocks rallied right from the opening bell: the dow surged 207 points, the nasdaq jumped nearly 63, and the s&p 500 rose 27. >> tom: those hopes about a fiscal cliff deal may be good enough for stock traders today, but is the economy in a position to deal with whatever solution politicians may hammer out? it's expected that the fiscal fix will involve tax hikes of some sort, and spending cuts as well. we spoke with economist dean baker from the center for economic and policy research, and economist douglas holtz- eakin of the american action forum. "n.b.r.'s" washington bureau chief darren gersh began the discussion by asking baker what tighter federal policy will mean for the economy in the coming year. >> insofar as we get austerity, we get tax increases, spending cuts, that's going to slow the economy. i anticipate a deal so we are don't see the full, you know, $500 billion tax increases 100 billion spending cuts but whatever we do see in tax increases, spending cuts will be a drag on growth which is really
PBS
Nov 23, 2012 12:00am PST
today. president obama-- in a weekly address-- urged the country to put aside partisan differences and unite. in new york, the annual macy's thanksgiving day parade wound its way through the streets of manhattan, as the area still copes from the aftermath of hurricane sandy. elsewhere, volunteers served thanksgiving meals to needy families at homeless shelters across the country, like this one in washington, d.c. turkey and all the trimmings were also served to u.s. troops overseas at bases in afghanistan and kuwait. the british broadcasting corporation appointed a new director-general in the wake of its worst crisis in years. tony hall-- a former bbc news executive and currently the head of the royal opera house-- will replace george entwistle. entwistle resigned from the post earlier this month, amid a controversy stemming from the bbc's coverage of child sex abuse. >> sreenivasan: next, reducing greece's big debt. the troubled country appears to be on track to get some much- needed aid next week. but european union leaders meeting at a summit this week are still unable to agree
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